Windows network locations can show your email address

Opening Windows explorer gave me a bit of a shock when I noticed a device on my network was broadcasting my full email address.  Shock might be a bit dramatic, but I was concerned for sure.  I’d rather not see something like that being broadcast.  Maybe it only shows up on my home network but I don’t like it.  So, after some poking around I found the culprit in the media streaming options.  To get there go to the Network and Sharing Center.

NetworkSharing2

 

Click “Change advanced sharing options.”
Scroll down to the “All Networks” section and click the down arrow.

Advanced

Click the “Choose media sharing options…”
On this screen you will see the email address that was being broadcast as the name of your library.

email

I took this a step further and decided to turn off the media sharing so the devices don’t even show up.  I’m not sharing anything through these devices anyways.  I’d rather turn on the things I want than have them on by default.  In Windows 8 I was able to just tell the machine to leave the homegroup and that made those devices not show up.  Windows 7 devices still showed up.  To get rid of these I had to stop the actual Windows Media Player Network service.  I first tried setting the service to manual but something else kept starting it back up when I rebooted so I disabled it.

HP Stream 7 tablet mini review

IMAG00155_1

The HP Stream 7 tablet seems like a good tablet. Solid build, good performance and nice screen. At $99 it’s a very good deal. Also comes with a year of Office 365 which is worth $65ish on its own. Full Windows 8.1, 1gb of ram, 32gb of storage (though you end up with about 18gb usable) with a micro SD slot. Can’t speak to battery life yet because I haven’t used it long enough. The only bad thing I’ve noticed so far is the speaker is weak and small and on the bottom edge. This is definitely a nice alternative to a Kindle fire and far less expensive than an iPad (with a much better operating system in my opinion).

Update 1:
On the battery life I would say it’s on the low end for a tablet. It’s around 5 1/2 hours of web browsing, email and such. That’s not long compared to many tablets out there but at $99 that’s not bad either. Unless you are a traveler and need longer or you have no life and can spend 8 hours a day on a tablet For the way I use this size of a tablet 5 1/2 hours is fine. And if you were just reading books and not surfing as much that would probably be more like 6 1/2 hours. A Kindle Fire is going to last longer probably closer to 8 hours and an iPad mini is probably 9 to 9 and a half. But each of those costs more, especially the iPad mini which starts at $400 unless you get a previous model which will still be $300ish.

Update 2:
A major issue I’ve found is the headphone jack on this is horrible. It has bad static and a slight buzz. If you are playing music you don’t notice it unless the music gets quiet and between tracks. This only happens when you have headphones plugged in but when you do it’s very noticeable. When you have a low cost device there are going to be compromises but this seems like something you shouldn’t see (or hear) these days. This one is a puzzling issue to me, how HP would put it out like this I don’t really understand. I found a couple of others who reviewed this tablet and mentioned the sound issue to so I don’t think I’ve just got a bad one.  Very disappointing considering I really liked everything else about this tablet.

  • Camera: QCAM-AA
  • Taken: 16 January, 2015

Exchange 2013 auto mapped mailboxes don’t close when removed

I have an Exchange mailbox with several other mailboxes that it has full permissions on.
Exhange 2010 or 2013, I don’t remember which, added a feature that adds the mailboxes to Outlook automatically.
So, instead of having to go to account settings and navigating to advanced settings and manually adding additional mailboxes to open it does it for you.

That’s great except when you don’t want them to or when you remove the full access permissions and it decides to stay in Outlook.

To remove a mailbox that keeps showing up even though you’ve removed the Full access permissions.  Open Active Directory Users and Computers find the users account.  Click on Attribute Editor.  Scroll down the list until you find msExchDelegateListLink and remove the user account you don’t want the mailbox showing up in.

You can also turn off Exchange auto mapping on individual accounts.
This will give Administrator full access on the TheUser account without automatically adding it to Outlook:
(so you will have to manually add the account in account settings, open these additional mailboxes)

Add-MailboxPermission -Identity TheUser -User ‘Administrator’ -AccessRight FullAccess -InheritanceType All -Automapping $false

 

Recipe: Smoked Brisket

SMOKED BRISKET
6 servings

4 tsp. kosher salt
1 Tbsp. (packed) light brown sugar
2 tsp. ground ancho chiles
1 tsp. paprika
1 tsp. ground cumin
1 tsp. granulated garlic
1 tsp. freshly ground black pepper
1 5 to 5 1/2 -lb. flat-cut brisket with 1/4 to 1/2 -inch layer of fat on one side
Store-bought barbecue sauce

4 cups hickory or oak wood chips, soaked in water for 1 hour
Foil broiler pan (for wood chips if using gas grill)
2 foil baking pans (for brisket)

Mix first 7 ingredients in a small bowl. Rub spice blend over brisket. Wrap brisket in plastic; refrigerate for at least 2 hours and up to 24 hours. Bring to room temperature before grilling.

Prepare grill for smoking. If using a charcoal grill: Build a low fire in a charcoal grill (you’ll need to light more charcoal in chimney to replenish two or three times during grilling). Drain 2 cups wood chips; scatter directly over coals. Return top grate to grill. If using a gas grill: Heat grill to medium-low. Drain 2 cups wood chips. Place wood chips in foil broiler pan and place pan directly on gas flame. Return top grate to grill.

Unwrap brisket and arrange fat side up in foil baking pan; place pan on grate over unlit part of grill. Cover grill. Insert instant-read thermometer in top vent. Heat grill to 300°F. Cook brisket, adjusting vents and adding more charcoal or adjusting gas levels as needed to maintain temperature inside grill at 250°F, until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the center registers 160°F, about 3 1 ? 2 hours. Baste brisket occasionally with pan juices and add more drained wood chips as needed.

Remove pan with brisket. Wrap brisket tightly in 2 wide sheets of heavy-duty foil. Discard pan and juices. Place in clean foil baking pan. Return to grill over unlit side, maintaining internal grill temperature at 250°F, until an instant-read thermometer inserted into thickest part of center of brisket registers 190°F, about 1 1\2 hours longer. Transfer brisket in pan to a rimmed baking sheet. Let rest for at least 1 hour and up to 2 hours.

Carefully unwrap brisket, saving any juices in foil. Transfer juices to a small pitcher. Place brisket on a work surface. Thinly slice brisket against the grain; transfer to a platter. Brush brisket with some juices. Serve with any remaining juices and BBQ sauce.

Windows 7 problem renaming folders – Could not find this item

My Windows 7 installation started throwing an error every time I created a new folder, renamed a file or tried to move a file.  It would say “Could not find this item.”

Deleting the following registry keys then restarting the explorer.exe process fixed it.

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\\SOFTWARE\\Microsoft\\Windows\\CurrentVersion\\Explorer\\FolderDescriptions\\{2112AB0A-C86A-4ffe-A368-0DE96E47012E}]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\\SOFTWARE\\Microsoft\\Windows\\CurrentVersion\\Explorer\\FolderDescriptions\\{2112AB0A-C86A-4ffe-A368-0DE96E47012E}\\PropertyBag]

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\\SOFTWARE\\Microsoft\\Windows\\CurrentVersion\\Explorer\\FolderDescriptions\\{491E922F-5643-4af4-A7EB-4E7A138D8174}]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\\SOFTWARE\\Microsoft\\Windows\\CurrentVersion\\Explorer\\FolderDescriptions\\{491E922F-5643-4af4-A7EB-4E7A138D8174}\\PropertyBag]

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\\SOFTWARE\\Microsoft\\Windows\\CurrentVersion\\Explorer\\FolderDescriptions\\{7b0db17d-9cd2-4a93-9733-46cc89022e7c}]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\\SOFTWARE\\Microsoft\\Windows\\CurrentVersion\\Explorer\\FolderDescriptions\\{7b0db17d-9cd2-4a93-9733-46cc89022e7c}\\PropertyBag]

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\\SOFTWARE\\Microsoft\\Windows\\CurrentVersion\\Explorer\\FolderDescriptions\\{A302545D-DEFF-464b-ABE8-61C8648D939B}]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\\SOFTWARE\\Microsoft\\Windows\\CurrentVersion\\Explorer\\FolderDescriptions\\{A302545D-DEFF-464b-ABE8-61C8648D939B}\\PropertyBag]

[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\\SOFTWARE\\Microsoft\\Windows\\CurrentVersion\\Explorer\\FolderDescriptions\\{A990AE9F-A03B-4e80-94BC-9912D7504104}]
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\\SOFTWARE\\Microsoft\\Windows\\CurrentVersion\\Explorer\\FolderDescriptions\\{A990AE9F-A03B-4e80-94BC-9912D7504104}\\PropertyBag]

Found the solution here.

SQL Server Reporting Services – Headers on all pages of a report

I have a report that spans multiple pages.  There are groupings and page breaks between the groupings.  I found that the header rows were not printing on all of the pages of the report.
I found the following instructions for doing it (the first two didn’t work for me but the third one did):

To display row headers on multiple pages

  1. Right-click the row, column, or corner handle of a tablix data region, and then click Tablix Properties.
  2. In Row Headers, select Repeat header rows on each page.
  3. Click OK.

To display column headers on multiple pages

  1. Right-click the row, column, or corner handle of a tablix data region, and then click Tablix Properties.
  2. In Column Headers, select Repeat header columns on each page.
  3. Click OK.

To display a static tablix member (row or column) on multiple pages

  1. On the design surface, click the row or column handle of the tablix data region to select it. The Grouping pane displays the row and column groups.
  2. On the right side of the Grouping pane, click the down arrow, and then click Advanced Mode. The Row Groups pane displays the hierarchical static and dynamic members for the row groups hierarchy and the Column groups pane shows a similar display for the column groups hierarchy.
  3. Click the static member that corresponds to the static member (row or column) that you want to remain visible while scrolling. The Properties pane displays the Tablix Member properties.
  4. In the Properties pane, set RepeatOnNewPage to True.
  5. Repeat this for as many adjacent members as you want to repeat.
  6. Preview the report.

Activate Office 2010 manually

Microsoft-Office-2010-Logo

To force Microsoft Office 2010 to activate manually open a command prompt (I assume with elevated privileges):

For 32bit:

cscript “C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Office\Office14\ospp.vbs” /act

For 64bit:

cscript “C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office14\ospp.vbs” /act

This is assuming that you’ve given Office a product key.  I also think this will work for Office 2013 by changing the Office14 to Office15 because that same ospp.vbs script is present in my copy of Office 2013.  I’m not sure if this works for retail versions of Office.  I only deal with volume licenses in my environment.

Add “Run as Different User” to right click of icon on Windows 8 start screen

By default right clicking on an icon on the Windows 8 start screen gives you the option to run an app as administrator but that just runs the app as the logged in user with elevated privileges.

What if you want to run the app as a totally different user?  You have to tweak a local group policy to add it.

Press the Windows key and R to get the Run dialogue box.

Type:  gpedit.msc

Navigate to User Configuration\Administrative Templates\Start Menu and Taskbar

In the right Window pane look for: Show “Run as different user” command on Start
If you click the Setting column it’ll sort the settings alphabetically.

Click Enabled then Ok.

To force the change to take effect press the Windows key and R again.

Type:  gpupdate /force

RunAsDiffUser

Now you should see Run as Different User when you right click an icon on the start screen.

RunAsDiffUser2

 

Remove “Test Mode” from desktop of Windows 8.1

Windows-8-1-blue-logo

Windows 8.1 released today.  I’ve been using it since they released it to Technet and MSDN subscribers last month.  It’s had an annoying “Test Mode Windows 8.1 Pro Build 9600” message on the desktop since I installed it.  I finally took time today to find out how to get rid of it.

Launch a command prompt as Administrator.

Type:  bcdedit -set TESTSIGNING OFF

Reboot.

No more Test Mode message.

Windows81TestMode

Update (10/20/2013):  I’ve had one commenter say this doesn’t work for non-Pro versions of Windows 8.1.  I haven’t verified this.

Internet Explorer Maintenance settings within Group Policy not getting applied for Internet Explorer 10

internet-explorer-10-logo-600x273

I’m a big fan of Microsoft.  I prefer nearly all of their products to the competitors.  Windows RT?  Love it.  Windows Phone?  Love it.  Microsoft Office?  Mostly love it.  Hotmail, SQL Server, Windows Server, Windows 7 and 8, Exchange Server and more I use and like a lot.  Sometimes though I have to scratch my head and wonder what someone at Microsoft was thinking.  Exchange 2013 brought a lot of good improvements.  The web interface for managing it is great.  There’s several things they changed that I’m still scratching my head about (mailbox delegation, anti-spam functionality and a few others).

Today I’m scratching my head about changes to Group Policy regarding Internet Explorer 10.  I have a handful of generic domain accounts that I don’t want on the internet.  They can access a few internet sites but mostly just intranet sites are allowed.  Up to this point I use Group Policy – Internet Explorer Maintenance settings to control that stuff.    You can enforce proxy settings and exceptions.  So, I make these generic users have a proxy address of 127.0.0.1 for all internet traffic and I feed it a list of exceptions I want to allow.  It’s not full proof, I know.  A slightly savvy user could get around these restrictions a few different ways but I’m not concerned with that.  I just want to make sure I’m doing something to block the normal user.

Here’s another head scratcher.  Why are there all kinds of Internet Explorer settings under the Administrative Templates/Windows Components/Internet Explorer and yet no connection settings there?  Why not just put the connection settings there and be done with it?  There’s probably a perfectly good explanation for that, surely.

Anyways, I’ve been loading several new Windows 7 machines and I noticed they were able to access the internet after running all of the Windows updates.  What’s up with that?  Well after much head scratching and running gpresult and web searches I finally find a document about how the Internet Explorer Maintenance settings were deprecated in favor of the Group Policy preferences.  Here is a document about the replacements as well.

Ok, I’m used to change.  I try new phones and tablets and devices all the time.  I can adapt.  I poke around and try to setup a set of preferences for IE 10.  You have to create the preferences in the Internet Settings of your group policy.  It’s a little funky.  You have to right click and select new.  Well I do that and there’s two items “Internet Explorer 5 and 6” and “Internet Explorer 7.”  Huh?  I’m doing the group policy editing on a Server 2008 machine with Service Pack 2 installed.  There’s no option for IE 8,9 or 10 (Oh, and what happens when 11,12 and 13 come out?).  Sheesh.  (What’s the gorilla have to do with this post?  Nothing.  His look is how I’m feeling at this point.)

More head scratching, more web searches and finally I find someone that says you can only make Internet Explorer 10 preference settings on a machine with Group Policy editor  running Windows 8 or Server 2012.  I haven’t deployed Windows 8 just yet but my workstation is running it.  So, I install the Remote Server Administration Tool for Windows 8.1.  This give me the Group Policy editor, I launch it using a Domain Admin account and now I can see a set Preference settings for “Internet Explorer 8 and 9”  and “Internet Explorer 10.”  Sweet!  I’m almost there right?  Nope.

Next I go through and create a set of preferences for Internet Explorer 10 and I set the home page and the proxy settings and the exclusions.  Go back to the Windows 7 machine I started with and run gpupdate /force.  Open Internet Explorer and……only a few of the preferences I configured are set.  The proxy address isn’t and the exclusions aren’t.  Seriously?  I’m getting tired and irritated by now.

More head scratching, more web searches and I run across a forum post where someone explains the green lines and the red dashed lines that are on the settings screen.  I saw them but didn’t really take notice of them.  Well the red dashed lines means that setting “may” getting applied and the green line means that setting will always get applied.   There’s nothing on the screen that indicates this nor is there anything that says that you can change it from red dashed to green.  You have to hit F6 on the setting to change it from red dashed to green.  You can hit F7 to change it from green to red dashed.

IE10GroupPolicySettings

After changing those things and running gpupdate /force on my Windows 7 machine the settings are applied and all is well.  Until someone at Microsoft decides to change it to something else.  Or IE 11 comes out.  Or the moon becomes full.